SECTION 2 MIDDLE LANDING TO THE NARROWS

Start of the Gorge Photo: Start of Gorge

Description: This photo was taken from the basin below the Gorge from a canoe looking towards the Fishing Lodge of the Nepisiguit River Salmon Club. To the right is the start of the Gorge.

Photo provided by Rod O’Connell August, 2007

The Basin Photo: The Bassin

Description: This photo was taken from the Fishing Lodge of the Nepisiguit River Club looking towards the basin. The person in the canoe is a salmon fishing guide for the Club.

Photo provided by Rod O’Connell August, 2007

Fishing in the Gorge Photo: The Nepisiguit Falls Gorge

Description: The Gorge is a beautiful spot below the Nepisiguit Falls. It has been a favourite spot for salmon fishers since the 1840s. Many authors, such as William Hickman, Lieut. Campbell Hardy, Charles Lanman, Robert Barnwell Rosevelt, Thaddeus Norris, Richard D. Ware, Arthur P. Silver, Frederick Irland, etc. have written stories in the late 1800s and early 1900s about their fishing experience on the Nepisiguit River. The Mi’gmaq people have fished for salmon on the Nepisiguit River for centuries.

Photo provided by Rod O’Connell August, 2007

The Great Falls Photo: The Great Falls

Description: This photo was taken from a view point on the east side of the River. Note on this photo that the Falls are still very visible. The Dam was built over the upper end of the Falls.  The construction of the Dam was started in 1919 and power was first produced in 1921. It was constructed by Bathurst Lumber Company, changed hands over the years and eventually bought by NB Power in 2007.

According to the Mi’gmaq Legend, the Turtle Rock at Nepisiguit Falls, facing east, is the beginning of creation.

 Photo provided by Rod O’Connell June, 2007

The Nepisiguit Falls Power Dam Photo:  Gilbert Sewell showing the symbol of the Nepisiguit Mi’gmaq Trail.  

 


Description: Gilbert Sewell along the Nepisiguit Mi’gmaq Trail. Gilbert is an elder, historian, folklorist, storyteller, guide, woodcarver, Mi’gmaq language instructor and former chief of the Pabineau First Nation.  The turtle symbol was designed by his daughter and is used as the indicator of the Trail location in some of the sections of the Nepisiguit Mi’gmaq Trail.

 Rod O’Connell, May 2008

 

Nepisiguit Mi’gmaq Trail Section #2

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